Children's Health and Wellness

Take the PMS Quiz

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) refers to a range of monthly symptoms that starts 1 to 2 weeks before a woman's menstrual period. Most women have at least some PMS symptoms. Learn more about PMS by taking this quiz.

1. Which group of women is more likely to have PMS?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is One culture may report different symptoms from another culture, but women from all walks of life are affected.A. Those in industrialized countriesB. Those in developing countriesC. Those in the Western hemisphereD. Women of all cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds2. What portion of menstruating women reports at least one symptom of PMS?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is But only 5% to 10% say they have symptoms severe enough to interfere with daily life, according to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.A. 25%B. 50%C. 75%D. 85%3. A more severe form of PMS is also known as:You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is usually used as a designation for severe cases of PMS. (Dysphoric means the opposite of euphoric, which is a comfortable, happy feeling.)A. Premenstrual dysphoric disorderB. Menstrual-related mood disorderC. Luteal disorderD. Baby blues4. How many different symptoms have been tied to PMS?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Some women have physical changes. Others have emotional changes. Not all women have all symptoms, according to the National Women's Health Resource Center. Of the 150 symptoms, these are among the most significant: Physical symptoms include abdominal bloating, headache, weight gain, and breast swelling. Emotional changes include irritability, mood swings, food cravings, and tension. Mental changes include depressive mood, anxiety, lack of concentration, and poor control of impulses.A. 15B. 25C. 100D. 1505. Symptoms of PMS can be confused with:You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is It can also be confused with diabetes, thyroid problems, allergies, and endometriosis, the ACOG says.A. Painful menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea)B. Fibrocystic breast changesC. DepressionD. All of the above6. Which of these hormones is thought to play a role in PMS?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is The exact things that cause PMS aren't yet understood, but serotonin, progesterone, and estrogen, plus other hormones and chemicals, may play a role, the ACOG says.A. SerotoninB. ProgesteroneC. EstrogenD. All of the above7. What has to occur for the symptoms to be diagnosed as PMS?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Symptoms appear after ovulation, about the 14th day of your monthly cycle. They disappear 2 weeks later, when your period begins, according to the ACOG. In addition, the symptoms must affect your life. Other illnesses, such as depression, must also be ruled out before a diagnosis of PMS can be made. PMS can co-exist with and may other illnesses and conditions worse. Asthma symptoms, for instance, can worsen with PMS. Typically, your healthcare provider will ask you to keep a diary of symptoms for 2 to 3 months before making a diagnosis.A. You must have at least 5 symptoms linked to PMSB. The symptoms must occur only during the second phase of your menstrual cycleC. The symptoms must occur every day or nearly every dayD. You must have noted the symptoms for at least a year8. What lifestyle change will ease PMS symptoms?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Your healthcare provider may recommend taking calcium, magnesium, and vitamin E to help relieve symptoms. Recent research has shown that estrogen regulates the levels of calcium and magnesium in the body, so taking extra calcium may help symptoms. Taking magnesium may help with symptoms of fluid retention and breast tenderness. For severe cases of PMS, a doctor may prescribe an antidepressant known as a serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor.A. Regular exerciseB. Diet of complex carbohydrates, including fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grainsC. Dietary supplementsD. All of the aboveYour score was:
Print Source: Created for Wellness Library/July 2002
Print Source: Epidemiology and pathogenesis of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder, Up to Date
Print Source: Patient information: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) (Beyond the Basics), Up to Date
Print Source: Patient information: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) (The Basics), Up to Date
Online Source: Premenstrual syndrome, American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologistshttp://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq057.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20121211T0945318772
Online Source: Premenstrual Syndrome, National Women's Health Resource Centerhttp://www.healthywomen.org/condition/premenstrual-syndrome
Online Source: Premenstrual Syndrome Fact Sheet, Office on Women's Healthhttp://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/premenstrual-syndrome.html
Author: Benda, Andrea
Author: Sinovic, Dianna
Online Editor: Sinovic, Dianna
Online Medical Reviewer: Goode, Paula, RN, BSN
Online Medical Reviewer: Sacks, Daniel, MD, FACOG
Date Last Reviewed: 5/22/2015