Children's Health and Wellness

Take the Lead Safety Quiz

Test your knowledge of lead poisoning and how to protect your family. This quiz is based on information from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

1. One of the most common places to find lead is in the home.You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Lead can leach into drinking water from certain types of plumbing materials (lead pipes and copper pipes with lead solder, for example). It can also be found on walls, woodwork, toys, and dinnerware made outside the U.S., as well as the outside of your home in the form of lead-based paint.A. TrueB. False2. As long as your children don’t eat paint chips, they aren’t in any danger from lead-based paints.You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Children—and adults—can breathe in dust from the paint. Lead dust can be deposited on floors, windowsills, and eating and playing surfaces, or in the dirt outside the home.A. TrueB. False3. Your home was built in 1964, so you don’t have to worry about lead paint in your house.You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Many homes built before 1978 may contain lead paint. Most paint made after 1978 contains no intentionally added lead, since it was banned from use on the interior and exterior of homes. Houses built before 1950 have the most potential lead hazard, as they are the most likely to have lead-based paint.A. TrueB. False4. Children should not put their fingers in their mouths when playing outside in the dirt.You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is If lead is in the soil, children can swallow harmful amounts of it if they play in the dirt or in dusty areas (even indoors) and then put their fingers, clothes, or toys in their mouths, or if they eat without first washing their hands. Not all soils contain lead.A. TrueB. False5. The most serious effects of lead exposure in children are vomiting and weight loss.You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is The most serious effect of lead exposure in children is brain damage. Lead exposure in youngsters can also affect a child’s growth, damage kidneys and impair hearing, as well as cause learning and behavioral problems.A. TrueB. False6. Kidney damage and peripheral nerve disorders are two effects of lead exposure in adults.You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Other health problems include increased blood pressure, digestive problems, sleep problems, muscle and joint pain, and mood changes.A. TrueB. False7. A level of 20 micrograms of lead per deciliter (mcg/dl) of blood is the threshold of concern for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is The CDC has set 5 mcg/dL as the minimum amount of lead for concern. The CDC recommends testing a child at his or her 1-year and 2-year checkups if the child is at high risk of exposure.A. TrueB. False8. A good way to test for lead at home is to use a do-it-yourself lead test kit.You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is The EPA has not approved and does not recommend do-it-yourself lead test kits. These kits, which do not require a lab to analyze the results, are not very accurate in determining the presence of lead paint. Instead, the EPA recommends hiring a lead inspector, who will take samples from the home and have them analyzed. A risk assessor can tell you the possible sources of lead in your home and what actions to take to lower lead exposure. For more information, or to locate lead-based paint inspectors, risk assessors and certified laboratories, visit the EPA website.A. TrueB. False9. If you are planning to renovate an older home, make arrangements for your children and any pets to stay elsewhere during the work.You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Infants, children, and pregnant women should not be in the home while renovations are under way. Exposure to lead dust is hazardous.A. TrueB. False10. Encouraging your child to eat plenty of foods that contain iron and calcium will reduce the risk of lead exposure.You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is A child who gets enough of these minerals will absorb less lead. Foods rich in iron include eggs; lean red meat; and beans, peas, and other legumes. Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt are also recommended for their high calcium content.A. TrueB. FalseYour score was:
Print Source: Created for Wellness Library/September 2001
Online Source: Facts on Lead, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/publications/1997/factlead.htm
Online Source: Lead Poisoning, American Academy of Pediatricshttp://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/all-around/Pages/Lead-Poisoning.aspx
Online Source: Lead, Occupational Safety and Health Administrationhttp://www.osha.gov/SLTC/lead/
Online Source: EPA Recognition of Lead Test Kits, EPAhttp://www2.epa.gov/lead/epa-recognition-lead-test-kits
Online Source: Learn About Lead, EPAhttp://www2.epa.gov/lead/learn-about-lead#found
Online Source: Lead: Protect Your Family, EPAhttp://www2.epa.gov/lead/protect-your-family#test
Author: Sinovic, Dianna
Online Editor: Sinovic, Dianna
Online Medical Reviewer: Chamberlain, Kevin, DO
Online Medical Reviewer: newMentor board-certified, academically affiliated clinician
Date Last Reviewed: 5/31/2013