Children's Health and Wellness

Take the Rabies Quiz

Rabies is a preventable viral disease of mammals most often transmitted through a rabid animal. The vast majority of rabies cases reported to the CDC each year occur in wild animals like raccoons, skunks, bats, and foxes.

1. The rabies virus is passed on by contact with what part of an infected animal?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is The rabies virus is transmitted to others through the saliva of the infected animal. All mammals can carry the virus. Humans can contract the virus through a bite from the infected animal, or from a scratch, scrape, open wound, or mucous membrane that comes in contact with the saliva. It is not possible to contract the virus by petting a rabid animal or through contact with the blood, urine, or feces of a rabid animal, the CDC says.A. SkinB. SalivaC. BloodD. ClawsE. B and C2. In which state is rabies not found?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Rabies is found in all states, and in many countries, including Canada and Mexico.A. AlaskaB. HawaiiC. FloridaD. MaineE. None of the above3. In which animal is rabies more likely to be found?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Before 1960, most rabies cases were found in domestic animals, such as the dog or cat. But with the rabies vaccine now required for pets and livestock, most rabies animal cases today are found in wild animals. It is found most often in raccoons, skunks, bats, foxes, and coyotes. Rarely it is found in rabbits, squirrels, rats, and opossums, although it it is becoming more common in groundhogs. Raccoons are a concern, the CDC says, because they often interact with household pets.A. DogB. CatC. BatD. RaccoonE. C and D4. If you have been bitten or scratched by a wild animal, what should you do?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is If you are on a hike and don't have soap with you, use water alone, the CDC says, but wash with soap as soon as you can. If you wake up to find a bat in your room or in your child's room, call your health care provider even if you don't think you've been bitten or scratched by the bat. Bats have small teeth that leave marks that aren't easy to spot, and you could have been bitten while sleeping without being aware of it. Even if you are bitten by an animal not likely to carry the rabies virus, you should still call your health care provider.A. Clean the wound with soap and water to remove any salivaB. Call your health care provider as soon as possibleC. Call your state or local health department as soon as possibleD. All of the above5. How soon do symptoms typically appear after a person is infected with the rabies virus?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Symptoms usually appear 30 to 90 days after exposure. Depending on the severity of the bite and the place on the body that was bitten, symptoms may appear more quickly. In rare cases, however, a person may not develop symptoms until a year or more after exposure.A. 48 hoursB. 1 weekC. 1 monthD. 1 year6. Which of these is an early symptom of rabies?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Other early symptoms include headache, fever, tiredness, sore throat, loss of appetite, stiff muscles, dilation of the eyes, increased saliva production, and unusual sensitivity to sound, light and, changes of temperature, the CDC says. As the disease progresses, convulsions are common, and the person may have severe throat spasms when trying to swallow. The disease continues to progress for about a week, until the person dies, usually of respiratory failure.A. A short period of depressionB. RestlessnessC. Itching and numbness around the site of the biteD. NauseaE. All of the above7. Which of these is a symptom of rabies in animals?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is The sound of a dog's bark may change, or the dog may bark or growl constantly. It may be restless and attack any moving object, the CDC says. These symptoms last three to seven days. This is followed by convulsions, paralysis and death. The paralysis sometimes appears early on, marked by paralysis of the lower jaw, drooling and foaming saliva. The animal may appear to be choking on something.A. Choking soundsB. Loss of appetiteC. AgitationD. TremblingE. All of the above8. How soon after a potentially infectious bite should a person be treated for rabies?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is The first stage in treatment is an injection of antibodies, called human rabies immune globulin (HRIG), and a rabies vaccine shot. The shot helps the body start producing its own antibodies to the virus. Ideally, the HRIG and the first dose of rabies vaccine should be given on the same day as the possible exposure. Even if the delay is longer than that, the CDC says, the person should still be given treatment. The rabies shot is given four times over a four-week period. The HRIG is injected around the bite site, with the remainder in the upper arm muscle. Side effects of the vaccine may include swelling or redness at the injection site, headache, fever, nausea, muscle aches and dizziness, the CDC says. Treatment for rabies must begin soon after exposure, because once symptoms appear, nothing can be done to stop the progression of the disease.A. Within 6 hoursB. Within 24 hoursC. Within a weekD. Within 2 weeks9. What can you do to prevent getting rabies?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Other recommendations from the CDC: Don't touch a dead animal; make sure your home is sealed to prevent wild animals from slipping into a basement, porch or attic; report any animals that are acting strangely to your local animal control department.A. Have your pets and other domesticated animals regularly vaccinated against rabiesB. Keep your dog on a leash when you take it outside your yardC. Don't approach wild animalsD. All of the aboveYour score was:
Online Source: Rabies, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/rabies/exposure/animals/index.html
Online Source: Rabies, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/rabies/location/index.html
Online Source: Rabies, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/rabies/prevention/index.html
Online Source: Rabies, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/rabies/diagnosis/index.html
Online Source: Rabies, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/rabies/transmission/index.html
Online Source: Rabies, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/rabies/symptoms/index.html
Online Source: Rabies, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/rabies/pets/index.html
Online Source: Rabies, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/rabies/medical_care/index.html
Online Source: Rabies, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/rabies/exposure/index.html
Online Source: Rabies, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/rabies/exposure/animals/other.html
Author: Sinovic, Dianna
Online Editor: Sinovic, Dianna
Online Medical Reviewer: Berry, Judith, PhD, APRN
Online Medical Reviewer: newMentor board-certified, academically affiliated clinician
Date Last Reviewed: 7/18/2013