Children's Health and Wellness

Take the Infant Immunization Quiz

Test your knowledge of vaccinations against a variety of diseases that can affect your child. This quiz is based on information from the CDC.

1. A pregnant woman passes antibodies to her unborn baby through the placenta to protect against certain diseases. About how long does this natural immunity last after birth?You didn't answer this question.You answeredThe correct answer is A pregnant woman passes on antibodies to those diseases she herself is immune to. That may last for one month to one year, depending on a number of factors. And women cannot pass on immunity to all vaccinated diseases. So immunizations need to begin before natural immunity wears off and to protect a baby from all vaccine-preventable illnesses.A. 1 monthB. 2 monthsC. 6 weeksD. 3 months2. Which vaccine is given soon after birth?You didn't answer this question.You answeredThe correct answer is The CDC recommends that this vaccine be given at birth and a second dose at age 1 to 2 months; please discuss with your child's health care provider to see whether a possible third dose is needed at age 6 months. This vaccine is especially important for infants who spend time in day-care centers or if the mother is hepatitis B positive, in which case the newborn is given both hepatitis B immune globulin and hepatitis B vaccine.A. PolioB. Hepatitis BC. Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR)D. Varicella3. Bacterial meningitis strikes infants more often than any other age group. Which vaccine will help prevent one previously common type of meningitis?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Hib vaccine prevents Haemophilus influenzae, type B infections, which can cause meningitis, pneumonia, and epiglottitis. The number of Hib meningitis cases have dropped dramatically since the vaccine was introduced. A meningococcal meningitis vaccine is also available, starting at age 11 or 12, to protect against another kind of meningitis.A. TetanusB. HibC. HIVD. Varicella4. What type of reaction commonly occurs after the diphtheria, tetanus, and cellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is A high fever, continual crying, or limp, listless behavior are signs of severe reaction that warrant a call to the doctor.A. Swelling and tenderness at the injection siteB. Fever up to 103 degreesC. Continual cryingD. Limp, listless behavior5. When should an infant not be given a DTaP vaccine?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is A mild illness, such as a cold with or without fever, shouldn't prevent immunization.A. The child has a moderate or serious illness with or without feverB. The child had a previous anaphylactic reaction (serious allergic reaction) to DTaP vaccineC. The child had encephalopathy after a vaccination when no other cause was apparentD. All of the above6. In the combined DTP immunization used in the past, which of the three vaccine components reportedly caused severe reactions?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Today, the pertussis vaccine is acellular (the whole bacteria cell is not present) and is denoted as DTaP, a much safer form with minimal side effects.A. DiphtheriaB. PertussisC. TetanusD. All three when given togetherYour score was:
Print Source: Created for Wellness Library/April 2005
Online Source: Bacterial meningitis, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/meningitis/bacterial.html
Online Source: Infant immunizations FAQs, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/parent-questions.html
Online Source: How vaccines prevent disease, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/howvpd.htm
Online Source: DTaP vaccine side effects, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/side-effects.htm#dtap
Online Source: Hib vaccination, CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/hib/
Online Source: Ask the experts, Immunization Action Coalitionhttp://www.immunize.org/askexperts/experts_per.asp
Author: Skurchak, Gina
Online Editor: Sinovic, Dianna
Online Medical Reviewer: MMI board-certified, academically affiliated clinician
Online Medical Reviewer: Turley, Ray, BSN, MSN
Date Last Reviewed: 6/25/2014