Children's Health and Wellness

How Much Do You Know About Tonsils and Adenoids?

Test your knowledge of tonsils and adenoids by taking this quiz, based on information from the American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS).

1. Tonsils are located on the back of the throat. Where are the adenoids located?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Although tonsils are visible when you open your mouth wide, adenoids cannot be seen without a flexible lighted instrument.A. At the base of the mouth, under the tongueB. In the earsC. Behind the nose and roof of the mouthD. None of the above2. What purpose do tonsils and adenoids serve in the body?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Tonsils and adenoids are lymph nodes, similar to those found elsewhere in the body. Their job is to block airborne bacteria or viruses that enter the body through the mouth or nose, and to produce antibodies against infection.A. No purpose; they are not neededB. They assist the nose with the sense of smellC. They are part of the body's immune systemD. None of the above3. Which of these is a common problem with tonsils?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Because they block invading bacteria and viruses, tonsils and adenoids sometimes become infected themselves. Frequent infections of the tonsils—called tonsillitis—can result in enlarged tonsils. People without tonsils can still get a sore throat, but symptoms may be worse in someone with tonsils. Adenoids, also, can become infected. Recurrent infections can lead to enlarged adenoids, which in turn can lead to breathing problems, especially at night.A. They make an infection worseB. They become swollenC. They can become infected themselvesD. B and C4. Most cases of tonsillitis occur in which age group?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Tonsillitis occurs most often in children, although adults can get it. Tonsils and adenoids play less of a role in fighting infection after about age 3. Tonsils tend to decrease in size after ages 8 to 12.A. 10 and underB. 11 to 21C. 21 to 40D. 40 to 65E. 65 and older5. Which of these may be a symptom of tonsillitis?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Other possible symptoms include tonsils that are redder than usual; tonsils that appear to have a white or yellow coating; painful swallowing; and a raspy voice because of the swelling, the AAO-HNS says. Bad breath without the other symptoms is quite common and does not indicate an infection. Tonsillitis may affect one or both tonsils. Call your child's health care provider if your child has a combination of these symptoms.A. Sore throatB. Bad breathC. FeverD. Swollen lymph nodes in the neckE. All of the above6. In the presence of a sore throat and fever, which of these can be a symptom of an adenoid infection?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Other symptoms include a voice that sounds as though the nose is stuffy and sleep apnea, in which the breathing stops momentarily during sleep. Call your child's health care provider if your child has these symptoms. Without an accompanying sore throat and fever, however, these symptoms do not indicate an adenoid infection. Snoring, ear infections, and mouth breathing may be caused by allergies. Noisy breathing may be caused by nasal congestion or asthma.A. Snoring during sleepB. Recurrent ear infectionsC. Breathing mostly through the mouth, rather than through the noseD. Noisy breathing while awakeE. All of the above7. How are infections of the tonsils or adenoids usually treated?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Antibiotics are used to treat infections caused by bacteria. In adults with mononucleosis, steroids may be prescribed to reduce the swelling of the tonsils and adenoids.A. AspirinB. AcetaminophenC. AntibioticsD. None of the above8. When do tonsils or adenoids need to be removed?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Although tonsillectomies were once nearly routine for children with tonsillitis, antibiotics are now the preferred treatment. Rapid strep tests allow doctors to immediately distinguish between bacterial infections (almost solely caused by streptococcus bacteria) and viral infections. The leading cause of sore throats is viral and should not be treated with antibiotics, the AAO-HNS says. Tonsils or adenoids may be removed, however, if a child has had at least three infections in one year and the tonsils or adenoids are causing breathing difficulties, such as snoring during sleep, sleep apnea, or intermittent obstruction. Recurrent infections also may affect the eustachian tube, leading to ear infections and possibly hearing loss. A child who has had his or her tonsils or adenoids removed is not at greater risk for infection. Other parts of the body's immune system step in to provide protection.A. When a child is 5 years oldB. When a child is 10 years oldC. When a child is having learning problemsD. None of the aboveYour score was:
Print Source: Created for Web/May 2004
Online Source: American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgeryhttp://www.entnet.org/healthinfo/throat/tonsils.cfm
Online Source: American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgeryhttp://www.entnet.org/healthinformation/tonsillitis.cfm
Online Source: American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgeryhttp://www.entnet.org/healthinformation/tonsilsadenoids.cfm
Author: Sinovic, Dianna
Online Editor: Sinovic, Dianna
Online Medical Reviewer: Bass, Pat F. III, MD, MPH
Online Medical Reviewer: Finke, Amy, RN, BSN
Date Last Reviewed: 5/22/2012