Children's Health and Wellness

What Do You Know About Child Development?

Test your knowledge of child development by taking this quiz.

1. When riding in a motor vehicle, how tall should a child be to sit in a regular seat and use an adult seat belt instead of a being strapped into a car safety seat or booster seat?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Children are usually big enough to use a regular seat when they are 8 to 12 years old. Before allowing your children to use the regular seat and adult seat belt, make sure the seat belts fit them. The shoulder belt should lie across the chest, not the neck or throat, says the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The lap belt should lie across the thighs, not the stomach. Children should be big enough to sit so that their back is against the back of the seat and their feet are hanging down, with the knees bent. Until your child reaches this size, he or she should remain in a booster seat.A. 3 feet, 5 inchesB. 4 feetC. 4 feet, 9 inchesD. 5 feet2. For which of these should you call your doctor instead of trying at-home treatment?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Call your child's doctor if your child has fallen or taken a blow to the head and briefly lost consciousness. Seek emergency medical help after a fall or blow to the head if your child is unconscious; is breathing abnormally; is bleeding from the mouth, nose or ear; has pupils of unequal size; is dizzy or confused; or is vomiting.A. DiarrheaB. Head traumaC. NosebleedsD. A and C3. Caffeine in cola and other beverages interferes with a child's ability to absorb which of these?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is Caffeinated beverages also may cause sleep problems in children and lead to dehydration in hot weather, because caffeine causes the body to eliminate water. Also, children who drink lots of carbonated beverages—whether caffeinated or not—often aren't drinking enough milk, a good source of calcium.A. CalciumB. MineralsC. OxygenD. Vitamins4. How fast has the rate of overweight children increased over the last 30 years?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is According to the CDC's America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2009 survey, 17 percent of children ages 6 to 17 were overweight in 2006. In 1976, 7 percent of children ages 6 to 17 were overweight.A. Hasn't increasedB. Increased by 10 percentC. More than doubledD. None of the above5. Menstruation can begin at which of these ages in girls?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is In the United States, the average age for a girl to start menstruating is 12. The start of menstruation—called menarche—cannot occur until a girl's entire reproductive system has matured.A. 8B. 12C. 16D. All of the above6. It's estimated that 3 to 7 percent of American school children have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Which of these famous people is thought to have had the condition?You didn't answer this question.You answered The correct answer is ADHD doesn't interfere with intellectual ability. Many ADHD kids are highly intelligent and creative.A. Ben FranklinB. Albert EinsteinC. Alexander Graham BellD. All of the aboveYour score was:
Print Source: Created for Vitality magazine
Online Source: Adult-Child-ADD-ADHDhttp://www.adult-child-add-adhd.com/categories/general/famous_people.php
Online Source: CDChttp://www.cdc.gov/Features/dsOverweightChildren/
Online Source: American Academy of Pediatricshttp://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/gradeschool/puberty/Pages/Girls-Secondary-Sex-Characteristics.aspx
Online Source: American Academy of Pediatricshttp://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/teen/nutrition/Pages/Calcium-The-Bone-Builder.aspx
Online Source: American Academy of Pediatricshttp://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/teen/nutrition/Pages/Hidden-Caffeine.aspx
Online Source: American Academy of Pediatricshttp://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/teen/nutrition/Pages/Importance-of-Calcium.aspx
Online Source: American Academy of Pediatricshttp://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/injuries-emergencies/Pages/Head-Injury.aspx
Online Source: American Academy of Pediatricshttp://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/on-the-go/Pages/Car-Safety-Seats-Information-for-Families.aspx
Author: Floria, Barbara
Online Editor: Sinovic, Dianna
Online Medical Reviewer: Bass, Pat F. III, MD, MPH
Online Medical Reviewer: Finke, Amy, RN, BSN
Date Last Reviewed: 12/29/2012