April 2011 Online Connection

April 2011 Online Connection

Amendment to Definitive Agreement Announcement

Phoenix Children’s Hip Preservation Program One-of-a-kind in Valley

Radiology Plans Move to New Tower

Pediatric Neurosurgery, Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Fellowships Coming to Phoenix Children’s

CNI Neuropsychologist Co-authors Study on Independent Living Status in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancers

Phoenix Children’s Pediatric Hepatologist Co-authors Study

Arizona Business Magazine Health Care Leadership Awards Honor Two Phoenix Children’s Physicians, Two Staff

Phoenix Children’s Hospital and Mayo Clinic to Host MARROWTHON

Phoenix Children’s One Call Physician Assistance Line Available for Admits, Consults, and ED Referrals

Amendment to Definitive Agreement Announcement

Phoenix Children’s Hospital and Catholic Healthcare West (CHW) recently executed a definitive agreement that will unite their respective pediatric programs within Maricopa County with services centralized at the Phoenix Children’s campus. CHW is the parent company of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Chandler Regional Medical Center and Mercy Gilbert Medical Center.

PCH and St. Joseph's Strategic Alliance logo

In initial announcements to the community regarding the agreement, the St. Joseph’s Medical Genetics Program was unintentionally omitted from the list of services transitioning to Phoenix Children’s Hospital. In addition to Genetics, other St. Joseph’s programs making the transition include cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery, critical care, general medicine, general surgery, neurology, neurosurgery, neuro-rehabilitation, oncology, orthopaedic surgery, pulmonary services, child abuse, pediatric rehabilitation, developmental pediatrics, and catheterization services.

Patients who currently receive these services at St. Joseph’s should continue seeing their physician for the time being; they will receive information regarding their physician’s move to Phoenix Children’s so their care can be transitioned.

More information on the Strategic Alliance between Phoenix Children’s and Catholic Healthcare West is located on the Physician Network.

Phoenix Children’s Hip Preservation Program One-of-a-kind in Valley

Phoenix Children’s Center for Pediatric Orthopaedics Hip Preservation Program, a service unique to the Valley, continues its growth. Headed by Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeon Judson Karlen, MD (pictured right), the program’s goal is to prolong the biologic longevity of the hip joint and delay or avoid the need for total hip replacement. The program treats patients living with hip dysplasia, developmental dysplasia of the hip, slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), Perthes disease, labral tears, and other pediatric hip disorders.

The group, which also includes Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons M. Wade Shrader, MD, and Jeffrey Vaughn, DO, performs a variety of joint-saving procedures, including periacetabular osteotomies (Ganz procedure), surgical hip dislocations, hip arthroscopy, and osteoplasties for childhood hip conditions that often become symptomatic as they approach early adulthood. When these surgical solutions cannot be recommended and proper indications are met, the group also performs surface hip replacements.

Karlen and Shrader are the only two pediatric orthopaedic surgeons in Arizona trained in the Ganz procedure. Vaughn, DO, is one of only a few physicians in the state performing hip arthroscopy.

In a recent week, the team completed no less than two periacetabular osteotomies for hip dysplasia, and two surgical hip dislocations: one to treat SCFE, and the other for an adolescent with Perthes disease.

To refer a patient to Phoenix Children’s Hip Preservation Program, please call (602) 933-3033.

Radiology Plans Move to New Tower

On May 3, Phoenix Children’s Imaging Department goes live in the Main Building. The new department offers added space and capacity to meet patient and physician needs. Here are some of the highlights of the new space:

  • Four ultrasound machines
  • Three fluoroscopy rooms
  • Implementation of digital radiography (state-of-the-art technology) in radiographic rooms, eliminating the need to carry and process CR plates. Images will be digitally processed in real time (automatically) in the exam room for faster throughput and a lower radiation dose to the patient
  • The new MRI unit is a 3 Tesla magnet system - twice the magnetic field of the current MRI scanners, one of the first scanners with this state-of-the art technology in the U.S.
  • Installation of a new 256-slice CT scanner. The current CT is 64-slice. The faster scan speeds of the 256 will offer additional applications for pediatric patients, one being cardiac imaging

Staying in the East Building for the time being and in its current location:

  • Radiography services and support to the ED
  • Neurodiagnostics and sleep lab

 

Pediatric Neurosurgery, Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Fellowships Coming to Phoenix Children’s

The Children’s Neuroscience Institute was recently approved by the American Board of Pediatric Neurological Surgery to offer a pediatric neurosurgery fellowship. The first fellow starts July 1, 2012.

 

According to the Accreditation Council for Pediatric Neurosurgery Fellowships website, pediatric neurosurgery fellowship training programs are required to have a minimum of two pediatric neurosurgeons in order to qualify. At least one must be board certified by the American Board of Pediatric Neurological Surgery (ABPNS). The second neurosurgeon must either have ABPNS certification or be board eligible and on the path to certification by the ABPNS.

Fellowship programs are inspected at least every five years or whenever there is a change in the program director. The program must maintain a minimum case load of 400 cases per year and be affiliated with an approved neurosurgical residency training program. Other requirements include appropriate exposure to child neurology, pediatric critical care, pediatric neuroradiology, pediatric anesthesia, pediatric surgery and neuropathology.

In related news, Phoenix Children’s Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine received a three-year accreditation from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) for 12 fellowship positions. Three years is the maximum ACGME will grant for an initial accreditation. The division hopes to welcome its first class of fellows in 2012.

According to its website, ACGME is a private, nonprofit council that evaluates and accredits medical residency programs in the United States. The ACGME has 28 Review Committees (one for each of the 26 specialties, one for a special one-year transitional-year general clinical program, and one for institutional review). Each Review Committee comprises about six to 15 volunteer physicians. Members of the Residency Review Committees are appointed by the AMA Council on Medical Education and the appropriate medical specialty boards and organizations. Members of the Institutional Review Committee and Transitional Year Committee are appointed by the ACGME Executive Committee and confirmed by the Board of Directors.

Congratulations to the Children’s Neuroscience Institute and the Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine.

CNI Neuropsychologist Co-authors Study on Independent Living Status in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancers

Children’s Neuroscience Institute Neuropsychologist Veronica Bordes-Edgar, PhD, recently co-authored the study, “Predictors of Independent Living Status in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study,” which was published in the international journal “Pediatric Blood and Cancer.”

At CNI, Bordes-Edgar evaluates children, from early childhood to young adulthood, whose central nervous system is not functioning normally. Much of her time is focused on assessing patients and consulting with families and providers in order to facilitate the day-to-day needs of pediatric patients. Additionally, Bordes-Edgar dedicates time to studying the neuropsychological sequelae of treatments impacting the central nervous system with previous research in the effects of radiation, chemotherapy and hematopoietic cell transplantation in children with oncological/hematological and genetic conditions.

For more information on the Children's Neuroscience Institute or to refer a patient, please call (602) 546-0990.

Phoenix Children’s Pediatric Hepatologist Co-authors Study

Tamir Miloh, MD, who is developing the Hospital’s Hepatology/Liver Transplant Program, recently co-authored the study, “Liver and combined lung and liver transplantation for cystic fibrosis: Analysis of the UNOS database.” Review the abstract of this study.

 

An avid researcher, Miloh has been a participating investigator in single and multicenter studies on compliance with medical regimen, liver transplantation, portal hypertension, acute liver failure, sclerosing cholangitis, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. He also has more than 30 publications in peer-reviewed journals and has presented at national and international meetings.

The only board-certified pediatric hepatologist in the state of Arizona, Dr. Miloh is triple-board certified in pediatrics; pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition; and pediatric transplant hepatology.

To meet with Dr. Miloh, refer a patient to the Hepatology/Liver Transplant Program, consult, or schedule a liver-related presentation, please call (602) 933-0940.

Arizona Business Magazine Health Care Leadership Awards Honor Two Phoenix Children’s Physicians, Two Staff

Arizona Business Magazine recently held its Health Care Leadership Awards, and among the winners were two Phoenix Children's physicians and two Phoenix Children's Hospital staff. 

P. David Adelson, MD, FACS, FAAP, director of the Children’s Neuroscience Institute, received the prestigious award in the category of Surgeon. Cristina Carballo, MD, the head of Phoenix Children’s Neuro-Newborn Intensive Care Unit, received a special merit award for excellence in the field of Neonatal Care.

The Water Watchers Program at Phoenix Children’s, under the leadership of Tiffaney Issacson and Ledon Dieu, received a finalist award in the category of Institution/Education Programs.

 

Congratulations to these individuals and their programs.

Phoenix Children’s Hospital and Mayo Clinic to Host MARROWTHON

The Ottosen Family Blood and Marrow Transplant (BMT) Program at Mayo Clinic and Phoenix Children’s Hospital will host the National Marrow Donor Program's Be The Match: MARROWTHON Donor Recruitment Campaign May 3 to May 5 at three Valley locations. This is a chance for members of the community and employees to help give the gift of life by joining the Be The Match Registry.

According to the Be The Match Marrow Registry (under the National Marrow Donor Program), every year more than 10,000 men, women and children are diagnosed with life-threatening diseases such as leukemia and lymphoma and do not have a matching marrow donor in their family. To live, they need to find an unrelated marrow donor whose tissue type matches their own. Patients are most likely to match donors of their same race and ethnicity. If more people joined the Marrow Registry, more patients would find a donor.

The drive will take place at three locations:

  • May 3, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., Phoenix Children’s Hospital, 1919 E. Thomas Rd., Main Lobby
  • May 4, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mayo Clinic, 13400 E. Shea Blvd., Scottsdale, in the Taylor Auditorium on the Concourse Level of the Clinic.
  • May 5, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mayo Clinic Hospital, 5777 E. Mayo Blvd., Phoenix, in Conference Room 1-212, located just off the atrium of the Main Hospital Building. If needed, ask for directions at the front desk.

People between the ages of 18 and 60 in generally good health are encouraged to attend the drive and fill out a short questionnaire. Then a small swab of cheek cells is taken with a cotton swab to determine the tissue type to be matched against patients who need a donor. This information is then added to the Be The Match registry. No extraction of blood or marrow takes place at the event – just the screening and the swabbing.  The test results are then added to the Registry.

If a patient is diagnosed with leukemia or lymphoma and does not have a matched sibling or family member, the Registry is consulted to see if there is a match.  If a match is identified, people on the Registry are contacted to ascertain their willingness to proceed with donation.

Phoenix Children's Hospital and Mayo Clinic in Arizona introduced the Valley's first pediatric blood and marrow transplant program. This program fills a critical gap in the Valley. Previously, the only pediatric BMT program in the state was at University Medical Center in Tucson. This meant that families in the Valley, already struggling with the burden of having a child with cancer, had to face the additional stress and inconvenience of having a child hospitalized in a distant facility for several months.

For more information about the Marrow Donor Recruitment Campaign, call Mayo Clinic at (480) 342-0564 or Phoenix Children’s Hospital at (602) 546-0824.  

 

Phoenix Children’s One Call Physician Assistance Line Available for Admits, Consults, and ED Referrals

Phoenix Children’s One Call Physician Assistance Line, (602) 546-DOCS (3627), is available to community physicians for admissions, ED referrals, and Phoenix Children’s Medical Group (PCMG) subspecialty consultation. This is not a line to schedule appointments. If you have any questions please contact Lynda Christel, Physician Relations, at (602) 546-5873.

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